costa rica to nicaragua

We love doing the borders without guides/helpers.  Our spanish is so limited, so if you know even the smallest amount of words, you can do it yourself.  Remember these words:  No nessisita ayuda!  That said, we went made it and stayed in a great hotel called Hotel Hex in Esteli, Nicaraguua and then into Honduras and stayed the night in Comayagua at  a decent hotel where we met some Americans who work there for a government contractor.  They made me feel much better about Honduras, as I have always been a bit leery of my safety here.  You may be wondering why we have been staying at hotels recently-answer, our solar has not been working so if we can’t find a campground with electricity when our batteries are low, we need a hotel.  Also, sometimes in a few of these countries, there is not a campsite with electricity. We are so looking forward to getting back into Mexico where we have more camping options.  Anyway, Nicaragua and Honduras are beautiful.  Now into Guatemala and then into Belize.

 

 

Monkeys and other critters of Costa Rica

February 14, 2015 Valentines Day.  Wes topped at a place along the Costa Rican coast to do a monkey tour.  Glad we did, I got to feed the wild monkeys and one climbedintot he boat we were in an sat on my head while the boat guide fed it a banana.  Yes, I am obsessed with these little critters.  While on the boat, we also saw a 5 foot crocodile, which would have been kind of cool, but they are one of two predators /enemies of the monkeys.  The other is the black boa constrictor.  Don’t go near the water little monkeys!!  As we left there and drove back through Jaco, two macaws flew right over us.  I love Costa Rica!.  We are it to our destination of Junquillal Bay, which is about an hour from away from crossing the Nicaraguan border.  WE stayed 2 nights.  On the ride in we saw monkeys along the road and several other times while camping here.  The campground is right on the beach and was filled with some families tent camping.  At night, we saw 2 Mapache (raccoons) up by the bathrooms and on the way out, we saw more coatimundi and a couple of Agouti (they look like giant Guinea pigs).  Made it through the Nicaragua border in just under 2 hours, no help needed thank you.  Stayed in Esteli.  On to Honduras tomorrow.

wild monkeys in Costa Rica

wild monkeys in Costa Rica

Monkeys playin in the trees on our walk through the jungle-Junquillal Bay, Costa Rica

Monkeys playin in the trees on our walk through the jungle-Junquillal Bay, Costa Rica

watching the monkeys playing in the trees-Costa Rica

watching the monkeys playing in the trees-Costa Rica

these birds were really cool-Junquillal Bay, Costa Rica

these birds were really cool-Junquillal Bay, Costa Rica

Iguanas are everywhere

Iguanas are everywhere

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Junquillal Bay-Costa Rica

Junquillal Bay-Costa Rica

Junquillal Bay-Costa Rica

Junquillal Bay-Costa Rica

wild monkeys in Costa Rica

wild monkeys in Costa Rica

wild monkeys in Costa Rica

wild monkeys in Costa Rica

baby 5 ft crocodile  in Costa Rica

baby 5 ft crocodile in Costa Rica

long nosed bats  in Costa Rica

long nosed bats in Costa Rica

panama pictures

locks at the Panama Canal

locks at the Panama Canal

Windmill Hostel in El Valle, Panama.  It was great

Windmill Hostel in El Valle, Panama. It was great

Windmill Hostel in El Valle, Panama.  It was great

Windmill Hostel in El Valle, Panama. It was great

5,500 miles to get my Taco Bell fix in Panama!

5,500 miles to get my Taco Bell fix in Panama!

Poor little monkeys in the zoo in Panama-not the most humane of zoos.

Poor little monkeys in the zoo in Panama-not the most humane of zoos.

the flowers of Panama-beautiful

the flowers of Panama-beautiful

the flowers of Panama-beautiful

the flowers of Panama-beautiful

Panama - the waterfall

Panama – the waterfall

Panama on the way to the waterfall

Panama on the way to the waterfall

Panama Canal

Panama Canal

Panama Canal

Panama Canal

Panama Canal

Panama Canal

Panama Canal

Panama Canal

Panama Canal

Panama Canal

Returning to America

After 5,400 miles from Buckeye, Arizona to Panama we are returning home.  Our plan is to go up through Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, the Yucatan (Mexico) and then up through Texas to Arizona.  It has been an amazing trip so far.  We have seen so many things that it is hard to put into words and pictures just don’t do it justice.  The people have all been helpful and friendly, the food has for the most part been very good, and the wild life has been amazing.  From the desert, Baja Peninsula and the mountains of Mexico, to the beaches of Central America, walking through the jungles of Costa Rica and Panama-all the ancient ruins we have seen and have yet to see, this has been the trip of a lifetime and we will always treasure it.  When we started this trip, we were a little concerned that the camper would get a bit cramped and we may just kill each other along the way.  Surprisingly, the camper seems to have grown and when we have stayed in hotels for various reasons, after a few days we get antsy about getting back to our “casa”.  Stay with us for a bit as we have a month or so to go and new terrain to visit.

Costa Rica-return trip

The border crossing was crazy as we to there behind the tour buses, so the long was line.  The border agent made Bob’s day when she looked at his passport and then held up a note to the window wishing Bob a happy birthday (she didn’t speak any English).  We decided to stick to the Main highway and go up through San Jose instead of staying close to the coast like we did on our first trip in order to see some different terrain.  It was a beautiful trip through the mountains and we did see lots of monkey crossing signs this way, although we didn’t see any monkeys.  We ae hoping to camp at a spot we heard about along the Junguilla Bay before crossing into Nicaragua.  Hope it is still open.  Today is Valentine’s Day and the first day of Carnival, so we are hoping the roads aren’t closed anywhere along the way.

Panama continued

We decided to veer off the main highway and go up to see the waterfall at El Valle, a mountain town about 30 km off the highway.  The road up was winding and very steep-not looking forward to the ride down this mountain, but that will come later.  We went to the water fall, the botanical garden and a zoo.  Very disappointing at the zoo after seeing the monkeys and macaws in the wild as I felt sorry for them, and we didn’t feel this was a very humane zoo.  Definitely not up to the care standards that we are use to in the US.  We decided to have lunch up in the town before making the treck down the mountaintop the highway.  While getting out of the truck, an American guy named Robert came up to us and said that if we hadn’t found lodging for the night, he ran the Windmill Hostal next door and had an area where campers could stay in the back.  By the time we found a nice little restaurant to eat lunch, it was pushing 2pm and decided to go check out the hostal.  What a great find!  All the rooms were full, but the camping area was great.  You can park on the grass and there is electric hookup if you need it by running your electrical cord into a window in the back.  Also has full water and use of the pool, showers, bathrooms and common rooms.  It was $5.00 per person without any hookup and $10.00 per person with hookups.  We would highly recommend this place.  Robert told us of a different way that was not found on our map or GPS to get back on the highway at Penonome that would cut about 40 kms and a couple of hours off our trip and wouldn’t be as steep.  It was the most beautiful drive and we were glad we took it.  It was steeper going up the mountain leaving town that when we came into town, but not as steep going down as it would have been the other way.  Once back on the highway, we saw a least a dozen or so signs warning of monkey and armadillo crossings.  They had the road all torn up for construction, so we didn’t see any, but the signs were fun.  Madde in back to David, Panama and heading across the border into Costa Rica tomorrow.

Panama

The Panama border crossing went pretty smooth and we made it on through to David, where we spent the night.  There is actually only one real highway crossing through Panama, but we hope to take some side trips after going to check out the Panama Canal.  We went down to the canal to watch the big ships go through the Miraflores Locks, and that is quite an engineering marvel to me.  Tomorrow, we will start working our way slowly back up to the states, going through Belize and then up the opposite side of Mexico from where we entered.  While still in Panama, we are hoping to check one of the waterfalls and do some birdwatching if we can.

Costa Rica continued

We went to the Manuel Antonio Preserve and along the drive in the small town before the preserve, we saw a monkey crawling across the electrical line from one side of the street to the other.  After we saw him, we looked up and saw two more sitting right in the middle of the street on an electrical line.  So Cool, Monkeys!!!  We got to the preserves and waited in a sweltering line to buy tickets, but they were closed for a little while, not sure why.  We about melted waiting in line and decided to give up and go get a drink at the bar down the little road.  Just as we got to the bar I looked up and saw a troop of about 12 monkeys playing around the roof and pool of the bar/hotel.  No tickets needed.  The pictures did not come out well as we could see them swinging through the trees, playing along the railing and climbing on the roof.  Oh well, we saw them.  Spent a week at Mark’s house in Costa Rica and loved it.  Ate some great food, saw monkeys and macaws, went zip lining through the rainforest, etc.  What a beautiful, if a bit humid for us Arizona folks, place.  I could have stayed here longer, but time to move on to Panama.

there is a little monkey on the red roof

there is a little monkey on the red roof

I picked breakfast-great fruit trees here

I picked breakfast-great fruit trees here

cool plane now a restaurant

cool plane now a restaurant

little monkey on the roof ready to jump onto the smaller tree

little monkey on the roof ready to jump onto the smaller tree

see the monkey on the red roof? Left hand side of the red tiled roof

see the monkey on the red roof? Left hand side of the red tiled roof

monkeys playing on this white building.  we must have seen about a dozen or so, wish the pictures showed them better.

monkeys playing on this white building. we must have seen about a dozen or so, wish the pictures showed them better.

Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Fun friends in Costa Rica

Fun friends in Costa Rica

Costa Rica fun

Costa Rica fun

IMG_0691

iguana's in the restaurant.

iguana’s in the restaurant.

crocodiles in Costa Rica

crocodiles in Costa Rica

coatimundi along the road in Costa Rica

coatimundi along the road in Costa Rica

Volcano at Lake Arenal in Costa Rica

Volcano at Lake Arenal in Costa Rica

Volcano at Lake Arenal in Costa Rica

Volcano at Lake Arenal in Costa Rica

so cute

so cute

coatimundi

coatimundi

coatimundi on the mountain road in Costa Rica

coatimundi on the mountain road in Costa Rica

coatimundi on the mountain road in Costa Rica

coatimundi on the mountain road in Costa Rica

sunset in Costa Rica

sunset in Costa Rica

sunset in Costa Rica

sunset in Costa Rica

watching the surfers at sunset in Costa Rica

watching the surfers at sunset in Costa Rica

Bob and Mark on the Beach in Costa Rica

Bob and Mark on the Beach in Costa Rica

lunchtime visitor in Costa Rica

lunchtime visitor in Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Oh my, it is beautiful here!  We stead the first couple of nights at a hotel at Lake Arenal, where we found a great bar/restaurant at our hotel that was having a Super Bowl party.  It was a really good time, and we wandered over to the volcano for the day as well.  On our way back from the hotel, we came a cross a huge group of Coatimundi.  I got some great photos of them and will post when I can.  We are heading to Jaco, where Bob’s friend Mark lives to spend some time staying at his house.  On the road to his home, we came across some crocodiles and sat in a restaurant where we were visited by several large iguanas.  While in the pool at Mark’s development in the late afternoon, we saw two Macaws who were squeaking and playing around in the tree behind us.  So cool!  We went zip-lining in the rainforest, which was amazing.  We are going to check out the Manuel Antonio preserve later this week and hopefully see some wild toucans.  We could spend a month just in Costa Rica!

Nicaragua

Bob’s friend Mark told us about a cool place in Nicaragua to hang out.  The town was Granada in the state of Granada.  Beautiful town square area and this place was full of Ex-Patriots from the US and Canada.  WE stayed 2 nights at 2 different hotels and found an old guy with a secure parking lot where we left the truck for $3.00 per day.  Not bad. On to the worst border crossing we have had so far as to how long it took us.  We were on the Nicaragua side of the border almost 3 hours because the immigration office was extremely slow and disorganized.  We usually spend hardly any time exiting a country, most of the time is on the country we are entering, but once we made it to the Costa Rica side, I would say it took about 1/2 hour to 45 minutes to get through, including the vehicle

Honduras

This border crossing was very frustrating.  We were cornered by a couple of con artist “guides” who offered to help us get throughout he border.  They kept trying to get us to give them all our original paperwork while we waited in the car and they would take care of it.  Not going to happen!  They tried to get us to do all this stuff we didn’t feel was necessary and we got frustrated after a bit, and took off on them to do it ourselves.  Once we got through the El Salvador side, we went into the Honduras side without any problems.  We stayed in a hotel in Choluteca, Choluteca.  It was ok, nothing fancy, and the floor was filthy, but the bed was clean.  Nothing to note here as I said we are just flying through these last few countries.  The drive to the border was only 30 miles, but took well over an hour because the potholes are big enough to hide a Volkswagen in.  At the border on the Honduras side, we were bound and determined to do it all ourselves.  We had a group of guys who attached themselves to Bob, following him along and he just ignored them.  the guy followed us onto the Nicaragua side and was madder than hell that we would not tip him. He did nothing for us other than tag along after we kept telling him to go away.  The Nicaraguans kicked him out!  On the Nicaraguan side, a really cool kid of about 14 helped us, got us through really fast and never came right out and asked for a tip, so of course we tipped him well.  He was such a professional polite young man and his too little brothers watched the truck for us.  We were ready to adopt these kids!

El Salvador-La Libertad

The border crossing here took about 2 hours, which seems to be about our norm.  The drive not the El Salvador side was beautiful and Bob said it reminds him of Costa Rica.  I will have to take his word for it.  I have had travelers illness since arriving in Guatemala and it seems to be getting worse.  We found a hotel for the night and ended up spending 3 nights here so I could recuperate.  The hotel has good secure parking and is right on the beach, so it was fine. In case you are wondering, we will be staying in hotels until after Costa Rica because our solar controller went out and without an electric hookup, which are few and far between on this leg of our trip, we cannot pop up the camper.  Once I was feeling a little ether,we got up on the 4th day and headed off to Honduras.

Guatemala

We are trying to get into Costa Rica as soon as possible so that we have somewhere to watch the super bowl, so Guatemala through Nicaragua will be a quick pass through and we will catch more of it on our way back up to the states.  It took us about 2 hours to get through the border check and right before you get to the border we passed through huge Chiquita banana plantations.  By the time we got onto the Guatemala side, wit was starting to get dark, so we needed to get to a hotel pretty quick.  We found a hotel that looks fairly safe for the night, but no restaurant near by.  I grabbed some bread and peanut butter from the truck, and that was our first meal in Guatemala.  The hotel was interesting and when we checked in, they gave us one flat sheet, two towels a bar of soap and a roll of toilet paper.  I put the sheets on the bed and discovered a suspicious looking glob of something on it.  Hmmm… well we flipped the sheet over, scooted the gecko that had fallen from the ceiling onto our bed onto the floor and called it a night.  The second night in Guatemala was spent in Jalpatagua, Jutiapa in the courtyard of an auto hotel.  The armed guard let us use one of the “rooms” bathrooms.  It was pretty busy with people coming and going throughout the evening.  For those of you not familiar with this kind of establishment, they rent by the hour.  The hotel had rooms with a bed and basic bathroom, and each room has a privacy gate in from of it so that you can pull your car in without your wife finding you:)  Then you do your business, pay for the time you used the room, and leave.  It was pretty busy from about 3pm to 9pm, then quite the rest of the night.

Oaxaca

We were torn on which route to take after leaving Cholula to head towards Costa Rica-across to Palenque, which is a must do on our list, or down through Oaxaca.  Since Oaxaca seems to be a quicker route, we decided to  head there and hit Palenque on the way back home.  We took the toll road as we got a late start and it was pretty uneventful and not as much culture to see, until…we came across our first “road block”.  At one of the toll booths, protestors had taken over the toll booth.  Some women were protesting something, not sure what, but I got a good picture of them.  They started at 100 pesos, but went down to 5.  We did not pay.  None of them spoke english, so after trying to talk us into giving them some money, they finally gave up and let us through.  At the next toll booth, there were more protestors, but this time they seemed more determined and one spoke english.  We asked what they were protesting and he said it was a strike-not sure what about.  Reluctantly, we gave them 50 pesos to get through.  Since the toll would have been 60 pesos, we were still better off financially.  Here is why I do not like to pay these people:  If they are collecting an average of 50 pesos per every 3rd car, that is a lot of pesos per day and what do they actually do with the money??  I think all it does is encourage this kind of extortion and gives all sorts of groups incentive to hold you up along the road.  Most of our fellow travelers would not agree-but I would rather buy something from them off the street of my own free will then be held captive until I pay.  Although I will say, the 2nd group was very polite and not thanked us for ur “donation” to their cause.  We found a great RV park that was not in Church and Church.  It is out on the website ioverlander.com though.  The park is in El Tule and is called Overland Oasis.  They prefer overlanders, not snowbirds who want to stay several months.  It was a little bit smaller than most, but a great place run by 2 Canadians, Leanne and Calvin.  Great hosts, decent wifi and the best bathroom/shower we have encountered.  I would have to say it may e cleaner than the one in my house:)  While here, we visited Arbol de Tule, a 2,000 year old cypress that is 164 feet high and 161 feet in circumference.  This is said to make it the largest tree in the world.  WE also visited Oaxaca Centro and went to Monte Alban to see the ruins.  They were impressive.  Uploading pictures is killing my wifi connection right now, so those will  have to wait.  Pushing on to Guatamala which should take us about 2-3 days.

Loreto

On to Loreto – The mission was in great shape for how old it was and the rodeo grounds were really tiny, but so are the horses. Mostly we saw mules and burros, with a few horses that stood way above the others. We could tell something was going to happen in the plaza, but didn’t know what so we decided to head back to Loreto and find a spot. However, the thing that was to happen was the parade of horses, which we had to wait for. As we tried to leave our parking spot, a police officer came over and told us we would have to wait about 40 minutes. We got out and went back up to the plaza and watched the horses come into the plaza and dance (yes the horses were dancing) and then parade through the streets. We thought we could leave after that, but the same officer stopped us and in fact leaned on the front of our truck, so that we would get the hint that we had to wait. Finally, we got to leave and then had a frustrating search to find the RV camp. We found one spot, but I was sure it didn’t look like the picture and it was kind of run down. Driving down the Malecon (waterfront), we heard someone call out “hey Bob”. What are the chances we run into someone we know on a waterfront road in a small town in Mexico? We looked out and saw Alex, Graham and Karen who we met on the beach a few days ago, coming across the road towards us. They were just walking around checking out the town looking for a place as well. I hope they found a spot as once we found ours we didn’t see them again. At our wits end, we stopped at the PemEx and asked if they knew where a camping spot was. They didn’t really know what we were saying, but I had a picture of the place and showed it to them. Back and forth gestures and we think we know the direction and as soon as we pulled in, it matched the picture I had.

The RV park, Rivera Del Mar, is great. It has hookups, a nice ramada, great banos (bathrooms) with clean showers and best find of all, Laundry facilities!!! A week on the road and our bedding needs washed. I have been doing our laundry in a washtub by hand but sheets are too big for that, so we will be spending 2 days here to get some chores done. When I was headed to the bano, I heard a familiar voice and looked to see Dave, another traveler we met on the beach a few days ago. He is a single guy from Florida traveling through in an 1970 VW bus. We are parked next to the German man we met on the road to San Javier. This is the most interesting adventure I have ever been on, life is good!

remote camping in in Santa Rosaliita

Black Friday – Left Cabo San Quintin heading to Santa Rosaliita to camp on the beach. It took us 6 hours to get there, not because it was far, but because we went through some twisting turning mountainous roads.  Two cows jumped up into the road in front of us and later a horse. There was nothing else for miles and miles (hours and hours).  We found the turn we were looking for, but the place wasn’t much, just a few houses and nothing else.  We were confused, but a couple from California stopped and told us the only camping was on the beach and we could follow them. The sand was that fine, drifting kind and we almost got stuck.  Then they led us up, over and down some really tough cliffs to their camp site  where his friends were set up.  They come here every year for the fishing.  It was beautiful and our first really “remote camping” so far.  The crashing waves helped me sleep like a baby.  We left the next morning and did much better on the sand as we were prepared for it.  Off we go! Once we got on the paved road, we got out to check the camper and saw that it had slid back a bit, so some minor adjustments needed to be made.  We used the InReach to send messages to friends since we have no phone service, but it messed Bob’s phone up and it needs to be reactivated, which isn’t going to happen until we find Wi-Fi. He should have bought a phone on Black Friday.  Life on the road is interesting.  Pictures will have to follow later as the internet has been hit or miss.

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving in Mexico

We went to a restaurant for a traditional Thanksgiving meal. Ok, not quite what we would call traditional, but there was turkey, gravy, mashed potatoes and football, so we were real close. We hitched a ride from Jorge (George) in his pickup so we didn’t have to lower the camper. Bob rode in the bed of the pickup and I was able to sit in the jump seat inside the cab. The stuffing was strange and the meal came with coleslaw and macaroni salad, both with fruit in it and both surprising good. We brought the leftovers back for our camp dogs. Later, we went down to the restaurant and met up with George and Toni, and met our campsite neighbors who came to sit with us as well. All great people and so much fun. Baja California does have a lot of Americans, so we are enjoying the companionship for as long as we can because the further into Mexico we go, the less likely we are to find people who speak English. Life in

Thanksgiving day-thankful for new friends

Thanksgiving day-thankful for new friends

catching a ride to Thanksgiving dinner

catching a ride to Thanksgiving dinner

Thanksgiving in Cabo San Quintin

Thanksgiving in Cabo San Quintin

Mexico so far is working out well.

La Bufadora to Don Eddie’s in Cabo San Quintin

After Ensenada we headed on to La Bufadora.  It was a beautiful spot and we went to the tourist spot, which was a crazy marketplace, but fun to watch.  Had some great seafood and tequila, then off to find a spot for the niight.  We found a quit spot overlooking the ocean all to ourselves and the camp host, complete with camp dog (which came in handy later).  Sat and enjoyed the view and made dinner by the ocean.  watched a movie and went to bed.  The trusty camp dog started barking around 230 in the morning and sure enough, 5 minutes later we heard a vehicle full of party goers pull onto the dirt road next to us and proceed to party and play loud music all night.  needless to say, this made me a bit nervous as we were in the middle of nowhere, but Bob just rolled over and went back to sleep.  The camp host’s husband came rolling in around 2:45 am so I was a bit note comfortable and fell back to sleep around 4:00 am.  Now off to check out Cabo San Quintin.  Took a bit of trying as our map and GPS did not show us where to go and we had trouble finding anyone who spoke English and our Spanish stinks.  Followed our instincts and headed down what we in US would think is a dirt road, met up with an American once we arrived who confirmed that we were indeed in the correct place.  It’s pretty cool and filled with other traveler’s so I think I will sleep tonight.  Below are a few pictures.  Met some fun Americans last night in the bar and going to a “traditional Thanksgiving Dinner” with them for thanksgiving.  Should be interesting.

Don Eddies in Cabo San Quintin

Don Eddies in Cabo San Quintin

Don Eddies in Cabo San Quintin

Don Eddies in Cabo San Quintin

lunch in La Bufadora

lunch in La Bufadora

repairs in Ensenada

repairs in Ensenada

camp site in La Bufadora

camp site in La Bufadora

camp site in La bufadora

camp site in La bufadora

La Bufadora

La Bufadora

Ensenada

Ensenada

La Bufadora - Pina Coladas

La Bufadora – Pina Coladas

La Bufadora

La Bufadora

La Bufadora

La Bufadora

La Bufadora

La Bufadora

La Bufadora

La Bufadora

La Bufadora

La Bufadora

DSC_0036

La Bufadora

La Bufadora

La Bufadora campsite

La Bufadora campsite

La Bufadora campsite

La Bufadora campsite

La Bufadora campsite

La Bufadora campsite

La Bufadora campsite #5

La Bufadora campsite #5

La Bufadora campsite

La Bufadora campsite

La Bufadora campsite

La Bufadora campsite

La Bufadora campsite

La Bufadora campsite

Don Eddies in Cabo San Quintin

Don Eddies in Cabo San Quintin

Don Eddies in Cabo San Quintin

Don Eddies in Cabo San Quintin

made it to Mexico

Well we made it into Mexico and to Ensenada the first night.  We found a great RV spot right on the ocean with hot showers, score!  We know it won’t be this way for long, but for our first night, we splurged at $25.  However, woke to the carbon monoxide alarm in the middle of the night and the camper was filled with propane fumes as the gas was leaking into the truck.  In the morning. we found and asked a tour guide at the information desk where to go for repairs and he grabbed his bus mechanic and they followed us to our vehicle.  They spent about 2 hours with us driving us to get parts and the mechanic fixed it.  Just to help.  Of course, we paid them anyway.

Ensenada, camping on the beach

Ensenada, camping on the beach

repairs in Ensenada

repairs in Ensenada

first actual "domestic beer"

first actual “domestic beer”

chilling in Ensenada

chilling in Ensenada

leaving Phoenix

leaving Phoenix

Ensenada

Ensenada

Mexico and Beyond

After so much planning, and talking, and planning, and packing, and repacking, and did I mention planning, the day has finally arrived.  Today we are pulling away from the comforts of home and traveling with our little home on our back or at least on the back of the truck.  Today will be a short trip.  Over to California so we can cross the border early tomorrow.  The blog will be updated as we can.  Follow us along to see if we get farther than 20 miles from the border.